The DC Times

A New Way to Look at the Cowboys, NFL, and Fantasy Football

By Jonathan Bales

Potential Cowboys Draft Picks: Barkevious Mingo, Johnathan Hankins, Sharrif Floyd

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I recently broke down three more potential draft picks for the Cowboys in April. The first is LSU defensive end Barkevious Mingo.

When it comes down to it, there are two essential traits you need in every position: size and speed. Characteristics like stamina and strength are certainly important, but they can be improved upon. Players can’t change their height and, for the most part, they can’t alter their natural speed.

Barkevious Mingo has size and speed like no other pass-rusher in this draft. At 6’5’’, 240 pounds, many are worried that Mingo is “too small” to play in the NFL. I’d be more worried about how my team is going to stop a defensive end with optimal length and elite (truly elite) speed. Mingo is rumored to have run a sub-4.5 40-yard dash, and that kind of athlete doesn’t come around too often.

See the whole scouting report on Mingo.

Next, I took a look at Ohio State defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins.

Hankins is listed at 6’3’’ and 322 pounds, although he’s probably closer to the 330 range. As you’d expect, Hankins is strong—very strong—and rarely loses ground off of the ball. Even when Hankins gets tired and loses leverage, he still doesn’t get driven backward.

Hankins’ bread-and-butter is stopping the run, and that’s something he’ll continue to do well in the NFL. He has the ability to eat up two blockers but he’s still athletic enough to shoot gaps at times. If you take all of Hankins top plays, he could stack up with just about anyone in the country. The problem is Hankins seems to get tired quickly—his conditioning will be a huge concern—and he plays like a third-round pick on the majority of snaps.

The entire report is over at NBC.

And at Dallas News, I broke down Florida defensive tackle Sharrif Floyd.

At 6’3’’, 305 pounds, Sharrif Floyd has good size to play either defensive tackle position in a 4-3 or defensive end in a 3-4. He’s a high-motor player that rarely gives up on plays; I watched over 100 snaps and saw consistent hustle. By all accounts, Floyd seems to be a very hard worker.

Floyd isn’t an overwhelmingly strong player and he’s not going to consistently maintain his ground. That means he’ll need to go to a team that will allow him to shoot gaps and make plays in the backfield, which he can do. Although he’s not overly stout at the point, Floyd still does a pretty good job of extending in traffic to shed blocks and make tackles.

Check out the entire article at DMN.

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