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100 Fantasy Football Tips in 100 Days, Day 15: Trades

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I’ve written three books on fantasy football and I have zero information about trades. I had an entire chapter on them for What the Experts Don’t Want You to Know and I scrapped it because I thought it was useless. Executing a quality trade is very much an art, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t proper ways to do it.

One mistake I see people make most when proposing trades is offering a player for another guy at the same position: a running back for a running back, for example. Sometimes your rankings will differ from the consensus, but for the most part, everyone has a pretty good idea of the relative value of each guy. It’s really difficult to present such a trade as beneficial for both you and the other owner.

But trades can indeed be advantageous for both parties involved. When offering trades in 2013, try to avoid the idea that you need to get the same position back in return. Yes, I know it hurts when you trade Matt Forte and you’re forced to place Le’Veon Bell into your starting lineup as your RB2, but the end goal is to more significantly upgrade another position more than the one you just downgraded. If you can get Dez Bryant in return for Forte and force a guy like Anquan Boldin out of your starting lineup, that’s a win.

The key to executing a good trade is to find a way to make it truly valuable to the other party instead of trying to swindle your opponents.

Now is the time when you buy my books and 2013 Draft Package.

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