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Do the Cowboys need another wide receiver?

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At Bleacher Report, I explained why I think the ‘Boys need another big wide receiver:

If you’re already sick of me writing that the Cowboys need a wide receiver, it’s going to be a long few months. To drill this point home, I’ll try to present my argument from a bunch of different angles.

One way to think about roster construction, in opposition of the “who can we add?” approach, is a “who can we currently not afford to lose?” mentality. In short, find potential leaks in the roster, assume that Murphy’s Law will sprout its ugly face and prepare for the worst.

Outside of quarterback Tony Romo, who is the one player the Cowboys can’t afford to lose? Who is the player who, if lost (or even if not contributing at a high level), could potentially devastate Dallas? The answer is wide receiver Dez Bryant, and it isn’t close.

Bryant is so incredibly important to Dallas because he’s one of the league’s premiere red-zone threats on a team that is otherwise poor at playing in tight areas.

If Bryant were to go down, who can Dallas rely on in the red zone?

Tight end Jason Witten has historically been mediocre at best near the goal line and wide receiver Terrance Williams probably doesn’t have the bulk to be dominant over the long run. I like tight end Gavin Escobar, but who knows if he’ll be utilized often and he’s probably not going to be as good between the 20s.

Yup, the Cowboys’ offense could be devastated if Bryant gets injured or, more likely, is taken out of the game by the defense. Vanderbilt wide receiver Jordan Matthews can fix that. Here’s what I wrote about him last week:

There are three things I care about in regards to wide receiver success: age, size (namely red-zone relevance) and college stats. Vanderbilt’s Jordan Matthews passes all three tests with flying colors. He’s 21 years old, checked in at 6’3″ at the Senior Bowl and posted at least 94 catches, 1,300 yards and seven touchdowns in each of the past two seasons.

You might argue that Rams wide receiver Tavon Austin also had awesome college stats, but Matthews’ are more impressive. Here’s why. As the guys at rotoViz will tell you, we should analyze receiver stats in terms of market share: the percentage of their team’s overall passing stats for which each player was responsible. Because West Virginia was so effective on offense as a whole, Austin’s market-share numbers weren’t as outstanding as Matthews’ market share stats.

If Matthews is available in the second round, he should become a member of the Dallas Cowboys.

Other Wide Receivers to Watch

Allen Robinson, Penn State (Round 1-2)

Donte Moncrief, Ole Miss (Round 4)

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