The DC Times

A New Way to Look at the Cowboys, NFL, and Fantasy Football

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100 Fantasy Football Tips in 100 Days, Day 1: Use a scientific approach.

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I started this “100 Fantasy Football Tips in 100 Days” series last year, and judging by the traffic I received (in the DOZENS), I’d say it was a massive hit, so it’s back. Each day for the next few months, I’ll post one fantasy football tip that I think is worth reading.

I have a bunch of awesome announcements coming soon – maybe a book or two on the horizon – but until then, check out this sample from RotoAcademy (my new fantasy football training school):

A Scientific Approach to Fantasy Football Is About Improvement

There are two reasons that I advocate a scientific approach to fantasy football, each related to one another. First, science is about progress. I remember a tweet from Fantasy Douche arguing something to the effect of “bad stats are better than no stats, because bad stats can be made into good stats.”

The idea is that science (and math/analytics) is self-correcting. Let’s say I create a model to predict tight end performance. After a few years, I tally the results and I see that it sucks horribly and I’d be better off just guessing. Well, the process through which I created a model in the first place can be used to improve the model; I can test to see which measurables are the most predictive and figure out how to better incorporate them into my model. I can turn a really crappy thing into a little bit better thing and then a little bit better thing before it’s an awesome thing.

This concept is related to the second reason I advocate a scientific approach to fantasy football: the process is just as valuable (perhaps more so) than the end result. One of the reasons I started RotoAcademy is because I noticed a humongous flaw in the way we’re approaching the game; there are countless articles like “Week 2 Waiver Wire Adds” and “Top 5 Running Back Sleepers,” but that sort of content is worthless within days or weeks. It might help you in the short-term (although probably not), but it certainly isn’t helping you become a better fantasy football owner in the long run.

Think about what you learned in college or high school. How much of the trivial shit do you still know? Any idea when Napoleon stormed the Bastille? How about the length of the Mississippi River? Could you point to Belarus on a map? Did you even know Belarus is a country?

The reason that college is valuable (for some) isn’t because of the insignificant shit you learn, but rather because you learn how to learn. The ability to problem-solve and rationalize is far more valuable than knowing a stupid fact.

Enroll in RotoAcademy now.

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